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vodokar
November 1st, 2016, 01:48
I wanted to start a thread for current players of Dungeon Crawl Classics Roleplaying Game (DCC RPG) and those that might be curious about it.

To be honest, Classic D&D isn't the right place for it, but there isn't really any other logical place to put it either, so I'll put it here. This thread can serve, now and in the future, to be a repository of knowledge on DCC RPG and it's vibrant and enthusiastic fan driven ecosystem and resources available for it. It can also serve as a place for Mutant Crawl Classics (MCC RPG), which is a sister game completely compatible with the DCC game that is due out summer of 2016.

I will first start with: What is Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG?

DCC RPG is an OGL game that uses a modified rules-light core of the d20 D&D 3e system engine to present a game that has an old school feel. "Modern Rules, Old School Feel" is one of the motto's used to describe it. Also, one close to my heart, is "It is time to PARTY like it's 1974" is the motto of the popular podcast about the game. So, what does this really mean? Modern Rules, but Old School feel. Isn't that an oxymoron? How could new school rules give an old school experience?

In order to understand this, we need to go back to the roots of our hobby. It all started when one wargamer, Gary Gygax, met another wargamer, Dave Arneson at the Origins convention and were discussing the "Chainmail" rules that Gary had published for medieval historical battles using miniatures. The idea was tossed around to make a fantasy supplement to allow Chainmail to play games like the fantasy and science fantasy books they read. The basis of this is what became the original D&D game presented in 1974. Forward things a few years and Gary Gygax, in the first Dungeon Masters Guide ever written for our hobby, put into it, Appendix N, the reading list that had inspired him to create the game of D&D.

What DCC does is posit the question, if Gary and Dave were alive today and had access to 40 years of experience in modern game design, how would they have created their game differently in order to best tell stories about the literature that was contained on that Appendix N reading list that was so inspiring to them. Thus, the Rules of DCC start with a modern game engine, but tailor it towards telling Appendix N type of stories.

If you can appreciate this fact, that it is a game that is designed to tell different stories than what your 5e, 4e, 3.5e, Pathfinder etc. games are designed to tell, then you can appreciate that this is a game that can happily coexist in your gaming life alongside your system of choice, because it is serving a different purpose and scratching a different itch.

Going back to the Appendix N Literature, we see prominently, the works of Jack Vance, Robert E. Howard, Edgar Rice Borroughs, Ashton Clark Smith, H.P. Lovecraft and Fritz Lieber, to name just a few. In those stories, we find the roots of the D&D fighter in the likes of Conan, Faffered, John Carter etc. We also see the basis for the thief class in the Grey Mouser and the tales of Lankmar. In Jack Vance, we see the basis for the magic system, in many cases, the exact spell names from the stories were brought into D&D, as well as some of the magic items.

But, how close does D&D actually mimic those tales? Back at that time, Gary and Dave were pioneering an entirely new genre of game from scratch and they didn't necessarily have the resources, knowledge or experience to make it do what they might want. We see Conan doing fantastical feats. We see magic in Jack Vance's work is variable, wild and not well understood. There are many other details that D&D doesn't quite get right in being able to tell those specific types of stories. Those are the places where DCC exells. It presents a game system tailored for those types of stories, where adventure and great danger may lay around the next corner; magic is very powerful, but difficult to accurately control, and you may owe some being for having tapped into their power; and the warrior shares his rightful place in the spotlight, capable of doing great mighty deeds that would make Conan proud. No doubt, it is a world that is not for the feint of heart. Death is always possible, but successes feel so sweet having braved those dangers.

DCC is a modern game with all the standard things you've come to enjoy, like Ascending AC, Base to Hit, the 3e Fort/Save/Will saving throw system etc. but with an old school ascetic where the danger is palpable and you'll be on your edge of the seat wondering what will happen. It is also a system, however, that puts a lot of control into the hands of the players to counteract the twists and turns of fate; it has a built in system of luck mitigation that counterbalances randomness and helps the player to control the rolls of the die based on resources they have under their control. Smart play can counterbalance poor luck of the die.

Zhern
November 1st, 2016, 04:05
I can't wait for MCC!

vodokar
November 1st, 2016, 04:38
@Zhern Absolutely, me too. Would you care to share with us what MCC RPG is? Tap, your it!

Trenloe
November 1st, 2016, 05:08
TL; DR please? ;)

I try to read everything on the forums - so Charles, a summary would help my frazzled brain a lot when trying to catch up on forum posts at the end of the day. :D

vodokar
November 1st, 2016, 05:25
TL; DR version: DCC is a modern game with all the standard things you've come to enjoy, like Ascending AC, Base to Hit, the 3e Fort/Save/Will saving throw system etc. but with an old school ascetic where the danger is palpable and you'll be on your edge of the seat wondering what will happen.

But, there is more to it than that. :)

vodokar
November 1st, 2016, 06:09
superb podcasts: For DCC: Spellburn http://spellburn.com/ For MCC: Glowburn http://podcast.glowburn.org/

Some outstanding resources:

Fanzines:
Crawl (especially # 6 and #10, which have new class descriptions for DCC)
CrawlJammer (dedicated to a SpellJammer setting conversion to DCC)
D.A.M.N. (like Dungeon magazine for DCC)
Crawling Under A Broken Moon (dedicated to a post-apocalyptic setting for DCC - much of this will especially be useful when MCC is released)
Black Powder Black Magic (dedicated to a Deadlands type setting for DCC)
The Gongfarmer's Almanac
Metal Gods of Ur-Hadad

Great Books by 3rd parties that expand on essential things in the core game:
Steel and Fury (Mighty Deeds)
Angels, Demons and Beings Between (Patrons)
Mind Games

Zhern
November 1st, 2016, 13:59
Okay, so MCC. If you take the Toxic Avenger, cross it with Plan 9 from Outer Space, Flash Gordon, The Hills Have Eyes, Planet of the Apes, Barbarella, 2001, and any other gonzo, off the wall sci-fi you can imagine, all mixed into one and turned into a modern (with old school feel) TRPG.

*EDIT: It was easiest to explain using the Kickstarter blurb for MCC*

The Setting: Terra A.D.

The characters in the Mutant Crawl Classics RPG live in a primitive world dominated by the bizarre side-effects of an ancient holocaust known only as the Great Disaster. Millennia after this cataclysmic extinction event, the world — now known as Terra A.D. (After Disaster) — has regrown into a lush tropical wilderness. The lifeforms that survive and flourish in Terra A.D. did so because natural selection rewarded their ancestors for possessing either very plastic or very hardy genomes. Plants and animals with wild and unstable mutations permeate the ecosystem and the food chain. Though some species have settled down into relatively stable body plans and are capable of reproducing true to form, there is still the chance in any given birth of a new mutation arising.

Of these mutations, the advent of intelligence and sentience are by far the most pervasive. Never before in the history of the world has it been home to so many competing sentient species. Many animal and plant species now possess rudimentary reasoning abilities, and more than a few walk upright, communicate with each other, and make use of tools. These sentient species are collectively known as Manimals and Plantients.

What few members of mankind that survived the Great Disaster meanwhile descended into barbarism and savagery, and eventually split into two separate species: Pure Strain Humans and Mutants. Rather than surviving the Great Disaster by virtue of constantly mutating genetics, the genome of Pure Strain Humans became hardened against radiation and other mutagenic environmental effects, leaving them an especially hardy and intelligent race. The Mutant species of mankind meanwhile evolved along an opposite path, never breeding true to form even within small tribal gene pools. A mutant is always born with at least one notable cosmetic mutation, and upon reaching post-adolescence, mutants will typically manifest a diverse set of unpredictable additional mutations, making them among the most bizarre and horrific of all Terra A.D. creatures.

No existing sentient species or culture on Terra A.D. has managed to rise above the Neolithic stage of civilization. Stone tools and a tribal hunter-gatherer society dominate, with even rudimentary agriculture being a very rare occurrence. Metallurgy and writing are unknown to most sentients.

The Ancient Ones

It is generally accepted among the denizens of Terra A.D. that there once existed a legendary race of an unknown type that ruled and ordered the world with an arcane force known as technology. While nearly every sentient species makes an apocryphal claim to be directly descendant of these protean techno-wizards of millennia past, the evidence for their existence is inarguable. Though long since passed out of all memory, the imperishable artifacts and ruined haunts of the Ancient Ones were manufactured of such incomprehensibly durable substances and with such super scientific knowledge as to be virtually immune to the ravages of passing centuries. Many such devices and places may yet be discovered relatively intact by those brave enough to plumb the taboo lands of Terra A.D.

The Characters: Class Options

It is the goal of every youngling to return from the Rite of Passage (MCC’s character funnel) with a potent enough artifact to be promoted to a Seeker Team. Seekers are those elite tribesmen whose job it is to go out into the wilderness, ruins, and taboo lands seeking ever-greater artifacts of the ancients for the benefit of themselves and their kinsmen.

Each genotype in MCC RPG has its own unique abilities and powers. Pure Strain Humans have Darwinian Luck and four classes from which to choose. Mutants, Manimals, and Plantients possess bizarre physical and mental mutations and individual race-as-class powers. Here’s a quick breakdown of the MCC RPG classes:

Sentinel (Pure Strain Human): A hardened warrior with an artifact bonus die for weapons and armor.
Shaman (Pure Strain Human): A worshipper of a Patron Artificial Intelligence, granted the ability to run wetware programs that alter the laws of physics.
Healer (Pure Strain Human): A tribal healer with expert knowledge in naturopathy healing techniques and able to get superior results from the medical artifacts of the ancients.
Rover (Pure Strain Human): A tribal scout with a knack for disappearing and then turning up on the other side of computer-locked doors and ancient security systems.
Mutant: A tribesman with mutations and an appearance so shocking to others he often acts first in battle.
Manimal: A sentient bipedal animal with mutations and an ability to attack at advantage in large packs.
Plantients: A sentient bipedal plant with mutations and the ability to influence the luck of others via fragrances, pollens, and pheromones.

Mutations

Mutations in MCC RPG each have a table of possible effects, from complete failure and the possibility of gaining a defect, to mighty mutational effects that can alter the very landscape. Mutations come in two types — passive and active. Passive mutations are permanent effects like armor, extra limbs, or enhanced stats. The effects for passive mutations are only rolled once per level. Active mutations are at-will powers, and their efficacy is rolled with each use.

Lost Super Science

The lost super science of the Ancient Ones is centuries in advance of anything that we have today. While many of the familiar tropes of post apocalyptic gaming are present in MCC RPG — like power armor, robots, and particle beam weapons — it’s always with a Vancian super science spin. Even a simple dazer pistol may come with its own AI and semi-sentient personality.

Patron AIs

Existing far above the level of mere robots, androids, and holograms are the Patron AIs. These godlike artificial intelligences may be ancient global satellite systems, military guidance computers, or even rogue quantum field AIs living in the EM field of the planet. But they all share one thing in common — a world-dominating agenda and the willingness to grant mortals great power if they are served faithfully.

Foes and Danger

Not since the Cambrian Explosion has the planet seen such a wild evolutionary radiation of mutations and bizarre lifeforms. If these were the only dangers permeating Terra A.D., they would be an abundance. But the world is also home to wounded lands soaked in radiation, volcanic crater countries, and the ruins of a civilization so powerful its technology functions yet, often in dangerous and unpredictable ways. Though long since perished, the Ancient Ones are also survived by the mightiest of their creations, the rogue chunks of “smart metal” that still roam the dark corners of the world. These robots and androids are animated by inexhaustible power sources, sometimes corrupted CPUs, and insanely murderous artificial intelligences. Taking back this world and re-building civilization may be the grand goals of the tribal elders, but most days you and your Seeker team are focused on just living to see tomorrow.

Plus All The Usual DCC Goodness

The Mutant Crawl Classics RPG is written to be 100% compatible with Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG. Character and setting transfers are seamlessly accomplished, and genre-mashing ability is built in — all using the same streamlined d20 system you know and love. If you’ve played DCC RPG before, you already know how MCC RPG works. If you’re new to the DCC RPG system, you’re in for a treat. Spells and mutations results are accomplished with the roll of a d20 and reference to an expansive results tables. D20 combat is simultaneously simplified and enhanced. Instead of an endless list of modifiers, increases and decreases in attack ability are accomplished simply by moving the roll up and down the dice chain (d3, d4, d5, d6, d7, d8, d10, d12, d14, d16, d20, d24, and d30). The DCC RPG system may seem at first glance to be a “swingy” combat system, but the Luck mechanic and spellburn/glowburn mitigate this tendency and balance the game beautifully!

NotRussellCrowe
November 1st, 2016, 15:02
What DCC does is posit the question, if Gary and Dave were alive today and had access to 40 years of experience in modern game design, how would they have created their game differently in order to best tell stories about the literature that was contained on that Appendix N reading list that was so inspiring to them. Thus, the Rules of DCC start with a modern game engine, but tailor it towards telling Appendix N type of stories.


Thanks, vodokar! I never understood what DCC was, I always thought it was an OSR game like Labyrinth Lord or Swords & Wizardry.

I have a question about the quoted paragraph: I was under the impression that C&C was Gary's modern RPG based on his years of experience and follows on 1e/2e mechanics. Is DCC just taking it one version further and basing it on 3rd rules (in addition to not having involvement from Gary and Dave)?

Please keep in mind my knowledge of the history of RPGs is rather limited so I'm asking to learn and become more knowledgeable about a hobby, not challenging you in any way.

Thanks!

Zhern
November 1st, 2016, 17:02
Thanks, vodokar! I never understood what DCC was, I always thought it was an OSR game like Labyrinth Lord or Swords & Wizardry.

I have a question about the quoted paragraph: I was under the impression that C&C was Gary's modern RPG based on his years of experience and follows on 1e/2e mechanics. Is DCC just taking it one version further and basing it on 3rd rules (in addition to not having involvement from Gary and Dave)?

Please keep in mind my knowledge of the history of RPGs is rather limited so I'm asking to learn and become more knowledgeable about a hobby, not challenging you in any way.

Thanks!

NotRussellCrowe,

Asking questions is good! No one will see that as a challenge. I can address this a bit but I'm sure others will be able to be much more thorough.

C&C (Castles & Crusades) is heavily influenced by Gygax and it is highly probable that EGG contributed to it (I couldn't find a definite source short of asking Stephen Chenault) since he was working with Troll Lord Games during that period on Gary Gygax's Necropolis, Zagyg, Yggsburgh and the like. I did double check the credits in the book and the following are noted as developers (James M. Ward worked with EGG from the TSR days): Stephen Chenault, Davis Chenault, Mac Golden, Robert Doyel, Todd Sandy, Todd Gray, James M. Ward. But, as I said, it is very likely that EGG had a hand in some of it due to the working relationship with Troll Lord Games.

DCC (Dungeon Crawl Classics) as it exists today, and much like C&C, started with the D20 system but then modifies it (i.e. fixes it) into the spiritual successor that would likely have been envisioned by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson (which is where the Appendix N comes in).

In short, both C&C and DCC are derived from the d20 system but are still a product of the Old School Renaissance thanks to OGL and the spirit of the game and system. Hope this helps (and that I didn't get my facts mixed up!).

vodokar
November 1st, 2016, 23:55
Thank you Zhern for sharing your knowledge. I would say you are pretty dead on regarding C&C and DCC. I would add though that while they do share some similarities, as they are intended for different purposes, they also have differences.

The purpose and intention of C&C is to take the d20 engine and make it simulate AD&D for the purpose of telling stories, primarily, of high or epic fantasy and dungeon crawling. Definitely the same idea of "Modern Rules, Old School Feel", but it's trying to accomplish it for a different purpose. Great game, btw.

Whereas, the purpose and intention of DCC is to take the d20 engine and effectively take D&D into territory it hasn't ever really been much before, at least for a very long time, which is telling stories similar to the Appendix N Swords and Sorcery (what might be called Low Fantasy) and Science Fantasy genres and even encourage genre smashing and weird tales. Thus, modifications to the rules are towards that purpose.

The TL;DR version would be: if you like AD&D, play C&C. If you want to feel like your Conan, play DCC. If you like both, which I certainly do, then play both. Clearly, there is much more to it than that, but it gives you some idea.

Oh, and just to be crystal clear, DCC/MCC is most certainly a product of the Old School Renaisance (OSR), but not a retroclone.

As for the TL;DR version of the explanation on MCC: It is a 100% DCC compatible version of Gamma World.

NotRussellCrowe
November 2nd, 2016, 01:56
Thank you to Zhern and vodokar for your explanations!

And I thought OSR and retroclone were the same thing. I don't recall there being OSR/retroclone talk back in the '90s when last I played D&D (before 5e).

Thanks again!

Zhern
November 2nd, 2016, 01:59
The OSR and retroclones didn't spawn until the 2000s when the OGL (open gaming license) was introduced with D&D 3e. A lot of great games have come out of that time period that are part of the OSR and honestly, right now is a great time to be a table top gamer.

NotRussellCrowe
November 2nd, 2016, 02:05
That does explain it. I have looked into Labyrinth Lord, I wouldn't mind running/playing a bit of that in the future. I did play some Basic D&D once--just one session--and really liked how simple it was. Reminds me of the video games Golden Axe and Dragon's Crown where each character fits a role and that's all you get. Good times!

Thanks again!

Zhern
November 2nd, 2016, 02:08
You bet. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask them. I do have to recommend Swords & Wizardry if you want to try a truly excellent retroclone. It is based on the 0e rules from 1974! Also, you can get the Complete Rules PDF free from the Frog God Games (https://www.froggodgames.com/swords-wizardry-complete-rulebook) website.

NotRussellCrowe
November 2nd, 2016, 02:11
I have downloaded that one but thought LL sounded more my style. I don't know much about 0e other than watching the videos by Matt Colville and a wee bit of reading, but thought that Basic and similar sounded more my style. Having said that I do want to read over the S&W rules and give it a go some day too!

vodokar
November 2nd, 2016, 02:49
The OSR and retroclones didn't spawn until the 2000s when the OGL (open gaming license) was introduced with D&D 3e. A lot of great games have come out of that time period that are part of the OSR and honestly, right now is a great time to be a table top gamer.

You got that right. It's like having your pie and eating it too. Old School, New School. Just play it all. And I don't recall us having Fantasy Grounds back in the 70's.

@NotRussellCrowe I know OSR topics can get a little confusing, but the gist of it is that there have been at least two and arguably three distinct waves of OSR products.

It started with the retro-clones, naturally, because a) a lot of people in modern times hadn't actually played the original games b) the original games, at the time at least, were out of print c) even old guys like me who had played the original games didn't necessarily still have a copy of the original games or their books were falling apart after 40 years and d) provide reference manuals for adventure writers so they could produce new material.

After that, came experimentation to tinker with old school rules to make new games from them; either new settings that had never been explored, with corresponding rules to match the setting and even new genre's.

A perfect example of both is Swords and Wizardry.

It is a retro-clone of original edition D&D, but, it comes in 3 varieties: from "white box" on one end, which is nothing but the original OD&D as it was introduced in 1974 to "Complete" rules Swords and Wizardry on the other end, which is essentially almost full blown first edition AD&D, because it represents the game as it existed when the first AD&D hardbacks were being released and after having had several years of development in supplements, dragon articles etc.

However, Swords and Wizardry is also a perfect example of a game where rules have been tinkered with to produce new games. You see, a) if you start from "white box" as a base, it is a very light weight set of rules which can serve as a framework for pretty much being able to bolt on whatever extra rules you wish without having to first gut the game b) S & W is free of charge and c) the developers of S & W allow people to make any modifications to their rules as they wish and then republish it, as long as it follows the proper licencing procedures. Thus, it is the perfect platform to start producing your own game. You would be amazed what people have done with it. For example, there are a couple of good sci-fi games based on the S & W whitebox engine and just in the last week, someone released a WWII game, of all things.

The third wave would be games like DCC, which strike out in a completely different direction, marching to their own beat, and giving us something really new. Even MCC will give us something completely new, because Gamma World was never compatible with D&D or AD&D, whereas, MCC is completely compatible with DCC.

NotRussellCrowe
November 2nd, 2016, 18:56
I quite enjoyed this discussion. Always like learning more about the history of this hobby, not like you can turn on Discovery and learn more.

vodokar
November 3rd, 2016, 01:27
Updated Post #6 with even more resources.

Zhern
November 3rd, 2016, 03:14
Speaking of MCC, the backer survey was sent out today. I'm doubly anxious to get it now!

vodokar
November 3rd, 2016, 03:18
I missed the kickstarter. Rub it in. Rub it in. You can make it up to me by judging a campaign next summer :).

Zhern
November 3rd, 2016, 03:30
I missed the kickstarter. Rub it in. Rub it in. You can make it up to me by judging a campaign next summer :).

Deal! I can definitely do that.

Myrdin Potter
November 3rd, 2016, 23:19
I answered the survey for MCC as well. I hope that they ship faster than the DCC Kickstarter.

vodokar
November 7th, 2016, 00:25
As stated above: DCC RPG is heavily influenced by Appendix N. So, what is Appendix N?

APPENDIX N: INSPIRATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL READING

Inspiration for all the fantasy work I have done stems directly from the love my father showed when I was a tad, for he spent many hours telling me stories he made up as he went along, tales of cloaked old men who could grant wishes, of magic rings and enchanted swords, or wicked sorcerors [sic] and dauntless swordsmen.

Then too, countless hundreds of comic books went down, and the long-gone EC ones certainly had their effect. Science fiction, fantasy, and horror movies were a big influence. In fact, all of us tend to get ample helpings of fantasy when we are very young from fairy tales such as those written by the Brothers Grimm and Andrew Lang. This often leads to reading books of mythology, paging through bestiaries, and consultation of compilations of the myths of various lands and peoples.

Upon such a base I built my interest in fantasy, being an avid reader of all science fiction and fantasy literature since 1950.

The following authors were of particular inspiration to me. In some cases I cite specific works, in others, I simply recommend all of their fantasy writing to you. From such sources, as well as any other imaginative writing or screenplay, you will be able to pluck kernels from which will grow the fruits of exciting campaigns. Good reading!

Anderson, Poul: THREE HEARTS AND THREE LIONS; THE HIGH CRUSADE; THE BROKEN SWORD
Bellairs, John: THE FACE IN THE FROST
Brackett, Leigh
Brown, Frederic
Burroughs, Edgar Rice: "Pellucidar" series; Mars series; Venus series
Carter, Lin: "World's End" series
de Camp, L. Sprague: LEST DARKNESS FALL; THE FALLIBLE FIEND; et al
de Camp & Pratt: "Harold Shea" series; THE CARNELIAN CUBE
Derleth, August
Dunsany, Lord
Farmer, P. J.: "The World of the Tiers" series; et al
Fox, Gardner: "Kothar" series; "Kyrik" series; et al
Howard, R. E.: "Conan" series
Lanier, Sterling: HIERO'S JOURNEY
Leiber, Fritz: "Fafhrd & Gray Mouser" series; et al
Lovecraft, H. P.
Merritt, A.: CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al
Moor****, Michael: STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; "Hawkmoon" series (esp. the first three books)
Norton, Andre
Offutt, Andrew J.: editor of SWORDS AGAINST DARKNESS III
Pratt, Fletcher: BLUE STAR; et al
Saberhagen, Fred: CHANGELING EARTH; et al
St. Clair, Margaret: THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS
Tolkien, J. R. R.: THE HOBBIT; "Ring trilogy"
Vance, Jack: THE EYES OF THE OVERWORLD; THE DYING EARTH; et al
Weinbaum, Stanley
Wellman, Manley Wade
Williamson, Jack
Zelazny, Roger: JACK OF SHADOWS; "Amber" series; et al
The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merritt; but all of the above authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.
- E. Gary Gygax, 1979, AD&D Dungeon Masters Guide, p. 224

If you really want to know what inspired our favorite hobby. Explore that reading list.

Zhern
December 28th, 2016, 02:27
Speaking of DCC, does anyone know if SmiteWorks has had any discussions with Goodman Games? leozelig's DCC stuff is excellent and I'm appreciative of him putting it out (and would be a great basis for an official ruleset). It would be great if it had DCC funnels and adventures in the store to go with it (which I can put together myself for my group, but I figured I would ask).

vodokar
December 28th, 2016, 02:31
My understanding is that Goodman Games has been contacted multiple times regarding their content for 5e, 4e, 3e and DCC RPG and they have never given any response. There are lots of materials for DCC RPG made by parties other than Goodman Games and perhaps requests to those people, most of whom are individual people, might be more fruitful.

Zhern
December 28th, 2016, 02:33
Purple Sorcerer Games puts out fantastic DCC stuff.

Myrdin Potter
December 28th, 2016, 03:05
I asked recently and told my question would be sent on to the powers that be. Maybe with a Pathfinder coming over more companies would get interested. I do know that Smiteworks will keep it quiet unless they were ready to launch it.

Zhern
December 28th, 2016, 03:17
Let's hope!

vodokar
February 13th, 2017, 01:38
This looks interesting:

http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2017/02/review-hubris-world-of-visceral.html

Zhern
February 13th, 2017, 01:44
Yeah it does. I picked up the PDF not too long ago but haven't had a chance to read through it yet. All I can say is Murder Machine!